Breaking and entering: lose the lock while embracing concurrency, Part I

September 2, 2015

This is the first half of a two-part series on applied lock-free techniques.

Providing robust message routing was a priority for us when building our distributed messaging infrastructure. This encompassed directed messaging, which allows us to route messages to specific endpoints based on service or client identifiers, but also topic fan-out with support for wildcards and pattern matching.

Existing message-oriented middleware, such as RabbitMQTM, provide varying levels of support for these but don't offer the rich features needed to power Wdesk. This includes transport fallback with graceful degradation, tunable qualities of service, support for client-side messaging, and pluggable authentication middleware. As such, we set out to build a new system, not by reinventing the wheel, but by repurposing it.

Eventually, we settled on Apache Kafka as our wheel, or perhaps more accurately, our log. Kafka demonstrates a telling story of speed, scalability, and fault tolerance—each a requisite component of any reliable messaging system—but it's only half the story. Pub/sub is a critical messaging pattern for us and underpins a wide range of use cases, but Kafka's topic model isn't designed for this purpose. One of the key engineering challenges we faced was building a practical routing mechanism by which messages are matched to interested subscribers. On the surface, this problem appears fairly trivial and is far from novel, but it becomes quite interesting as we dig deeper.

Back to basics

Topic routing works by matching a published message with interested subscribers. A consumer might subscribe to the topic "foo.bar.baz," in which any message published to this topic would be delivered to them. We also must support * and # wildcards, which match exactly one word and zero or more words, respectively. In this sense, we follow the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) spec:

The routing key used for a topic exchange MUST consist of zero or more words delimited by dots. Each word may contain the letters A–Z and a–z and digits 0–9. The routing pattern follows the same rules as the routing key with the addition that * matches a single word, and # matches zero or more words. Thus the routing pattern *.stock.# matches the routing keys usd.stock and eur.stock.db but not stock.nasdaq.

This problem can be modeled using a trie structure. RabbitMQ went with this approach after exploring other options, like caching topics and indexing the patterns or using a deterministic finite automaton. The latter options have greater time and space complexities. The former requires backtracking the tree for wildcard lookups.

The subscription trie looks something like this:

 

Even in spite of the backtracking required for wildcards, the trie ends up being a more performant solution due to its logarithmic complexity and tendency to fit CPU cache lines. Most tries have hot paths, particularly closer to the root, so caching becomes indispensable. The trie approach is also vastly easier to implement.

In almost all cases, this subscription trie needs to be thread-safe as clients are concurrently subscribing, unsubscribing, and publishing. We could serialize access to it with a reader-writer lock. For some, this would be the end of the story, but for high-throughput systems, locking is a major bottleneck. We can do better.

Breaking the lock

We considered lock-free techniques that could be applied. Lock-free concurrency means that while a particular thread of execution may be blocked, all CPUs are able to continue processing other work. For example, imagine a program that protects access to some resource using a mutex. If a thread acquires this mutex and is subsequently preempted, no other thread can proceed until this thread is rescheduled by the OS. If the scheduler is adversarial, it may never resume execution of the thread, and the program would be effectively deadlocked. A key point, however, is that the mere lack of a lock does not guarantee a program is lock-free. In this context, "lock" really refers to deadlock, livelock, or the misdeeds of a malevolent scheduler.

In practice, what lock-free concurrency buys us is increased system throughput at the expense of increased tail latencies. Looking at a transactional system, lock-freedom allows us to process many concurrent transactions, any of which may block, while guaranteeing systemwide progress. Depending on the access patterns, when a transaction does block, there are always other transactions which can be processed—a CPU never idles. For high-throughput databases, this is essential.

Concurrent timelines and linearizability

Lock-freedom can be achieved using a number of techniques, but it ultimately reduces to a small handful of fundamental patterns. In order to fully comprehend these patterns, it's important to grasp the concept of linearizability.

It takes approximately 100 nanoseconds for data to move from the CPU to main memory. This means that the laws of physics govern the unavoidable discrepancy between when you perceive an operation to have occurred and when it actually occurred. There is the time from when an operation is invoked to when some state change physically occurs (call it tinv), and there is the time from when that state change occurs to when we actually observe the operation as completed (call it tcom). Operations are not instantaneous, which means the wall-clock history of operations is uncertain. tinv and tcom vary for every operation. This is more easily visualized using a timeline diagram like the one below:

This timeline shows several reads and writes happening concurrently on some state. Physical time moves from left to right. This illustrates that even if a write is invoked before another concurrent write in real time, the later write could be applied first. If there are multiple threads performing operations on shared state, the notion of physical time is meaningless.

We use a linearizable consistency model to allow some semblance of a timeline by providing a total order of all state updates. Linearizability requires that each operation appears to occur atomically at some point between its invocation and completion. This point is called the linearization point. When an operation completes, it's guaranteed to be observable by all threads because, by definition, the operation occurred before its completion time. After this point, reads will only see this value or a later one—never anything before. This gives us a proper sequencing of operations which can be reasoned about. Linearizability is a correctness condition for concurrent objects.

Of course, linearizability comes at a cost. This is why most memory models aren't linearizable by default. Going back to our subscription trie, we could make operations on it appear atomic by applying a global lock. This kills throughput, but it ensures linearization.

In reality, the trie operations do not occur at a specific instant in time as the illustration above depicts. However, mutual exclusion gives it the appearance and, as a result, linearizability holds at the expense of systemwide progress. Acquiring and releasing the lock appear instantaneous in the timeline because they are backed by atomic hardware operations like test-and-set. Linearizability is a composable property, meaning if an object is composed of linearizable objects, it is also linearizable. This allows us to construct abstractions from linearizable hardware instructions to data structures, all the way up to linearizable distributed systems.

Read-modify-write and CAS

Locks are expensive, not just due to contention but because they completely preclude parallelism. As we saw, if a thread which acquires a lock is preempted, any other threads waiting for the lock will continue to block.

Read-modify-write operations like compare-and-swap offer a lock-free approach to ensuring linearizable consistency. Such techniques loosen the bottleneck by guaranteeing systemwide throughput even if one or more threads are blocked. The typical pattern is to perform some speculative work then attempt to publish the changes with a CAS. If the CAS fails, then another thread performed a concurrent operation, and the transaction needs to be retried. If it succeeds, the operation was committed and is now visible, preserving linearizability. The CAS loop is a pattern used in many lock-free data structures and proves to be a useful primitive for our subscription trie.

CAS is susceptible to the ABA problem. These operations work by comparing values at a memory address. If the value is the same, it's assumed that nothing has changed. However, this can be problematic if another thread modifies the shared memory and changes it back before the first thread resumes execution. The ABA problem is represented by the following sequence of events:

  1. Thread T1 reads shared-memory value A
  2. T1 is preempted, and T2 is scheduled
  3. T2 changes A to B then back to A
  4. T2 is preempted, and T1 is scheduled
  5. T1 sees the shared-memory value is A and continues

In this situation, T1 assumes nothing has changed when, in fact, an invariant may have been violated. We'll see how this problem is addressed in the second half of this series.

Building a foundation

At this point, we've explored the subscription-matching problem space, demonstrated why it's an area of high contention, and examined why locks pose a serious problem to throughput. Linearizability provides an important foundation of understanding for lock-freedom, and we've looked at the most fundamental pattern for building lock-free data structures, compare-and-swap. Part two of this series will take a deep dive on applying lock-free techniques in practice by building on this knowledge. We'll continue our narrative of how we applied these same techniques to our subscription engine and provide some further motivation for them.

Comments

Just use a processor that provides atomic CAS instructions.

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